WorldCat, market sector / literature research

Given the unreliability of the catalogue system I’m using at present, together with recent efforts to source previously listed publications. The abilities of worldcat software, to integrate with your own applications filtering searches until the library has no excuse for loss of the book in the first instance!?

Continue reading “WorldCat, market sector / literature research”

WorldCat, market sector / literature research

marketing and its paradigms, Adopt a “Competitive Innovation” approach to most major IT systems contracts

“neoliberalism” has also come into wide use in cultural studies to describe an internationally prevailing ideological paradigm that leads to social, cultural, and political practices and policies that use the language of markets, efficiency, consumer choice, transactional thinking and individual autonomy to shift risk from governments and corporations onto individuals and to extend this kind of market logic into the realm of social and affective relationships..

This is in contrast to an earlier reference, on the topic of system design posted on #24.06.10: methodologies for the design of soft systems for generations x, y & z *(reply b)

Smaller companies have been overlooked because of the perceived risk to delivery and long-term support, yet these smaller innovative companies have delivered cost-effective solutions for large commercial operations where cost constraints are more prevalent.

Highlighting the market driven shift, helping to maximise the role of private business sectors in determining economic and political priorities of the state, and to what extent these shifts are able to be commanded autonomy to a greater extent in future years, following recent news that government, dis-illusioned by approaches of the ‘big four’, are looking to franchising of government contracts.

Broadly speaking, neoliberalism seeks to transfer control of the economy from public to the private sector,[4] under the belief that it will produce a more efficient government and improve the economic health of the nation.

marketing and its paradigms, Adopt a “Competitive Innovation” approach to most major IT systems contracts

BlogSpot, Marketing and its paradigms *(extract)

Adopt a “Competitive Innovation” approach to most major IT systems contracts
by jamesfirth on July 14, 2010 at 10:59AM

It’s well documented how many government departments have wasted public money when commissioning IT systems. From databases to websites headline figures in the order of tens of millions have been spent on systems which have either failed to deliver, could have been implemented at a tenth of the price, or both.
Whilst I acknowledge that government has only ever strived to do things well and create the “right” system, the current approach which centres on a reliance on a few preferred IT providers has proved time and time again to fail to deliver value for money.

The reliance on the “big four” IT systems providers and a willingness to accept these large companies’ marketing claims at face value has lead to massive over-pricing in the market.
Smaller companies have been overlooked because of the perceived risk to delivery and long-term support, yet these smaller innovative companies have delivered cost-effective solutions for large commercial operations where cost constraints are more prevalent.

The paradox is thus: that a smaller company may fail to deliver a system costing around £1m yet the large established providers typically won’t “get out of bed” for less than £20m.

The solution is what I term Competitive Innovation. Continuing the above crude example, several smaller companies, say seven in total, would each be commissioned to create competing systems at a cost of £1m each. The best system would be selected and the risk of non-delivery mitigated. Total project cost would save £13m.
Some doubt that such savings could be made, yet my company created a budget management system for private companies working on government contracts at a cost of around £500,000 because the approx £32m revamp of a government system was still unable to provide the functionality that the private companies needed to track the performance of their commission within the agency (see http://www.budget-bathmat.com).
The price tag for bespoke or tailored systems in the private sector I estimate to be a least one whole order of magnitude lower than the cost of similar government systems in the instances where I’ve had access to price information.

Continue reading “BlogSpot, Marketing and its paradigms *(extract)”

BlogSpot, Marketing and its paradigms *(extract)